Sunday, November 1, 2009

King Tut's Real Face

Kig Tut's Real Face - Experts reveal the young pharoah's unshrouded face in public for the first time.



COLLECTION OF WORLD BEST



ALL IN ONE



NOW VIST



SOLVED PROBLEM OF HUMAN WORLD


MYA (11)






Members of the press surround the remains of Egypt's boy king Tutankhamun placed in a glass urn designed to protect the remains of the ancient king from humidity and other contamination brought by a constant flow of over 350 visitors a day in his tomb in the Valley of the Kings, close to Luxor, 500 kms south of Cairo. The true face of ancient Egypt's boy king Tutankhamun was revealed on Sunday to the public for the first time since he died in mysterious circumstances more than 3,000 years ago. (AFP/Cris Bouroncle)


An archaeological worker looks at the face of the linen-wrapped mummy of King Tutankhamun as he is removed from his stone sarcophagus in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor. The true face of ancient Egypt's boy king Tutankhamun was revealed on Sunday to the public for the first time since he died in mysterious circumstances more than 3,000 years ago. (AFP/Pool/Ben Curtis)





COLLECTION OF WORLD BEST

ALL IN ONE


NOW VIST

SOLVED PROBLEM OF HUMAN WORLD



MYA (11)






Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass (Center) supervises the removal of the linen-wrapped mummy of King Tutankhamun from his stone sarcophagus in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor. The true face of ancient Egypt's boy king Tutankhamun was revealed on Sunday to the public for the first time since he died in mysterious circumstances more than 3,000 years ago. (AFP/Pool/Ben Curtis)


Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass (3rd from Left) supervises the removal of the lid of the sarcophagus of King Tutankhamun in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor. The true face of ancient Egypt's boy king Tutankhamun was revealed on Sunday to the public for the first time since he died in mysterious circumstances more than 3,000 years ago.(AFP/Pool/Ben Curtis)

The face of Pharaoh Tutankhamen is displayed in a climate-controlled case at his tomb in the Valley of the Kings, close to Luxor, 500 kilometres south of Cairo. The true face of ancient Egypt's boy king Tutankhamun was revealed on Sunday to the public for the first time since he died in mysterious circumstances more than 3,000 years ago. (AFP/Cris Bouroncle)


A photo released by the Supreme Council of Antiquities and the National Geographic Society on May 10, 2005 shows a model of King Tutankhamun made by a French team based on facial reconstructions from CT scans of King Tutankhamun's mummy. Teams of forensic artists and scientists built models of the boy pharaoh's face based on some 1,700 high-resolution photos from CT scans of his mummy to reveal what he looked like the day he died nearly 3,300 years ago. The linen wrapped mummy of King Tut was put on public display for the first time on Sunday, Nov. 4, 2007, 85 years after the 3,000-year-old boy pharaoh's golden enshrined tomb and mummy were discovered in Luxor's famed Valley of the Kings. (AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities and the National Geographic Society, HO)


The feet of the mummy of boy pharaoh King Tutankhamun is seen in Luxor's Valley of the Kings November 4, 2007, as it is displayed for the first time in public in a special climate-controlled glass showcase after it was taken out of its sarcophagus. (Nasser Nuri/Reuters)





COLLECTION OF WORLD BEST



ALL IN ONE



NOW VIST



SOLVED PROBLEM OF HUMAN WORLD


MYA (11)





The stone sarcophagus containing the mummy of King Tutankhamun is seen in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor November 4, 2007. (Nasser Nuri/Reuters)

Zahi Hawass, head of the High Council for Antiquities, stands next to the mummy of the boy pharaoh King Tutankhamun in Luxor's Valley of the Kings November 4, 2007. (Nasser Nuri/Reuters)


The mummy of King Tut is removed from his stone sarcophagus in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Egypt Sunday, Nov. 4, 2007. The mummy of the 19-year-old pharaoh, whose life and death has captivated people for nearly a century, was placed in a climate-controlled glass box in the tomb, with only the face and feet showing under the linen covering. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, Pool)


The sarcophagus of King Tut is placed back in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Egypt Sunday, Nov. 4, 2007. The mummy of the 19-year-old pharaoh, whose life and death has captivated people for nearly a century, was placed in a climate-controlled glass box in the tomb, with only the face and feet showing under the linen covering. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)


A photographer photographs the face of the linen-wrapped mummy of King Tut in his new glass case in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Egypt Sunday, Nov. 4, 2007. The mummy of the 19-year-old pharaoh, whose life and death has captivated people for nearly a century, was placed in a climate-controlled glass box in the tomb, with only the face and feet showing under the linen covering. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

The sarcophagus of King Tut is seen in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Egypt Sunday, Nov. 4, 2007. The mummy of the 19-year-old pharaoh, whose life and death has captivated people for nearly a century, was placed in a climate - controlled glass box in the tomb, with only the face and feet showing under the linen covering. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)


The face of the linen-wrapped mummy of King Tut is seen in his new glass case in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Egypt Sunday, Nov. 4, 2007. The mummy of the 19-year-old pharaoh, whose life and death has captivated people for nearly a century, was placed in a climate-controlled glass box in the tomb, with only the face and feet showing under the linen covering. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Zahi Hawass, head of the High Council for Antiquities, speaks to the media over the climate-controlled acrylic glass showcase containing the mummy of King Tutankhamen, after it was removed from his stone sarcophagus, in his underground tomb in the Valley of the Kings in Luxor November 4, 2007. Egypt put the mummy of the boy pharaoh Tutankhamun on display in his tomb in the Valley of the Kings on Sunday, giving visitors their first chance to see the face of a ruler who died more than 3,000 years ago. REUTERS/Ben Curtis/Pool (EGYPT)


Zahi Hawass (back, 3rd from Left), head of the High Council for Antiquities, supervises the removal of the mummy of King Tutankhamen from his stone sarcophagus in his underground tomb in the Valley of the Kings in Luxor November 4, 2007. Egypt put the mummy of the boy pharaoh Tutankhamun on display in his tomb in the Valley of the Kings on Sunday, giving visitors their first chance to see the face of a ruler who died more than 3,000 years ago. REUTERS/Ben Curtis/Pool (EGYPT)

Egypt's antiquities chief Dr. Zahi Hawass speaks to the media near the tomb of King Tut in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Egypt Sunday, Nov. 4, 2007. The mummy of the 19-year-old pharaoh, whose life and death has captivated people for nearly a century, was placed in a climate-controlled glass box in the tomb, with only the face and feet showing under the linen covering




COLLECTION OF WORLD BEST



ALL IN ONE



NOW VIST



SOLVED PROBLEM OF HUMAN WORLD


MYA (11)




No comments:

Post a Comment

Search This Blog

Loading...